Tools to Find a Career and Apply to College (Parts 1 and 2)

college gradParents and students put themselves under great pressure when college application time rolls around. With just a little bit of preparation, and planning ahead instead of waiting until Fall of their Senior High School year, the process can be less stressful and more insightful. Rather than spend money on application and search help – save those dollars to pay for college instead.

Many people get the college application process reversed, or worse, skip the first important and critical step.

Part 1 below discusses and has useful links to resources to evaluate the student’s interests and strengths – and what career fields would be a good match to those. If they’re like any high school student, they don’t have much of an idea what careers are out there in the economy or how to evaluate those careers as a possible match for them.

Once the student has an idea what interests them, then they are better prepared to evaluate colleges that cater to that career area. Preparation oftentimes begins in their Freshman high school year – what classes do they need to get into the colleges that cater to their career? Waiting until Fall of their Senior high school year is too late! Of course, during their high school years, many change their minds or refine their interests. That’s part of the process! And classwork preparation is part of that too.

Part 2 below then provides links and resources about college searches, financial aid, etc. Now the process is more focused having gone through the first part above.

Rather than spend money on a firm promising to do all this for you – and this “shortcut” often reduces the student’s involvement in the process – keep those important dollars for the real goal … paying tuition!

PS. Trying to use “Best Colleges” lists bias your selection to those lists and the criteria used to develop the list. Instead, develop your own short list of best colleges for your own student specifically. You may put one end of the list a “reach” school … and the other end of the list a “safety” school. Reach is one that has lots of criteria for acceptance or may be just a bit more expensive than you may think (sticker price is often not the final price). Safety is a school that is both within reach financially, meets the students career objectives, and is within bounds for acceptance criteria.

And now that your student has an idea about what career they may be interested in … the NEXT step is the one people think about when working on applying for and paying for college.

 

Article posted at AdviceIQ: Part 1  and Part 2

Original blog … College Search and Application Help Services – a Good Idea? … that inspired my syndicated article (with links to other resources that were not incorporated in the articles above).

Note: Your RSS feed or email may not show the embedded part of this blog … please go to the blog website to see the embedded media part of the post.

Click to Tweet:  Tweet: Tools to Find a College (Parts 1 and 2) and take stress off the search and application process.

 

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5 Responses to Tools to Find a Career and Apply to College (Parts 1 and 2)

  1. Larry Frank, Sr. February 8, 2014 at 8:26 am #

    A great article about college cost myths: Busting the 5 myths of college costs
    By Penelope Wang @Money August 23, 2013: 3:22 PM ET

    http://money.cnn.com/2013/09/01/pf/college/college-costs.moneymag/

  2. Larry Frank, Sr. February 17, 2014 at 6:19 am #

    The links across the top of the CFPB webpage walk you through the process of college search all the way through to repaying student loans.

    http://www.consumerfinance.gov/paying-for-college/choose-a-student-loan/#o1

  3. Larry Frank, Sr. April 18, 2015 at 7:43 am #

    Income-Based Repayment and Loan Forgiveness: Implications on Student Loan Debt

    http://www.onefpa.org/journal/Pages/APR15-Income-Based-Repayment-and-Loan-Forgiveness-Implications-on-Student-Loan-Debt.aspx

  4. Larry Frank, Sr. August 22, 2016 at 6:33 am #

    This site has useful tools to research salaries post graduation, for example, under the Student Programs tab (other tabs provide useful insights too)

    https://www.educatetocareer.org/

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